Helen Noir
  From ES Magazine, 30 August 2017 (interview by Frankie McCoy)    Helen Noir    Performer   Noir remembers hearing Allegri’s Miserere at the age of five ‘and being totally transported. Actually, I remember thinking it would be good music for a death scene. I was a very dramatic child.’ Having grown up in Tasmania, the 42-year-old classically trained singer now lives in Stoke Newington and met Adams when she was ‘singing Purcell and crying red tears’ at Camden People’s Theatre with melodramatic camp performer Scottee’s Eat Your Heart Out collective. He asked her to fly to Tokyo to perform at that Louis Vuitton party and she immediately said yes. Besides singing and dancing for Adams, she’s also an electronic music producer, composing live original soundtracks (performed at cult Hoxton club The Glory), for films such as Eyes of Laura Mars and Daughters of Darkness (she describes her style as ‘lots of looped opera vocals, Eighties reverb guitar and techno’). All of which is a far cry from her nine-to-five job as a PA at a law firm, but then, ‘most of what we do in the Theo Adams Company feels very natural to me — I find I have more surreal moments at my corporate day job.’   How do you prepare for shows?   ‘Often right before I go on I can’t remember any of the show or any of my technique, but I’ve learnt to trust that moment as it usually means I’m ready.’   Full article here

From ES Magazine, 30 August 2017 (interview by Frankie McCoy)

Helen Noir

Performer

Noir remembers hearing Allegri’s Miserere at the age of five ‘and being totally transported. Actually, I remember thinking it would be good music for a death scene. I was a very dramatic child.’ Having grown up in Tasmania, the 42-year-old classically trained singer now lives in Stoke Newington and met Adams when she was ‘singing Purcell and crying red tears’ at Camden People’s Theatre with melodramatic camp performer Scottee’s Eat Your Heart Out collective. He asked her to fly to Tokyo to perform at that Louis Vuitton party and she immediately said yes. Besides singing and dancing for Adams, she’s also an electronic music producer, composing live original soundtracks (performed at cult Hoxton club The Glory), for films such as Eyes of Laura Mars and Daughters of Darkness (she describes her style as ‘lots of looped opera vocals, Eighties reverb guitar and techno’). All of which is a far cry from her nine-to-five job as a PA at a law firm, but then, ‘most of what we do in the Theo Adams Company feels very natural to me — I find I have more surreal moments at my corporate day job.’

How do you prepare for shows?

‘Often right before I go on I can’t remember any of the show or any of my technique, but I’ve learnt to trust that moment as it usually means I’m ready.’

Full article here

 Loverboy Magazine, October 2016 (interview by Fallon Gold)  "I love performing songs of desperation and obsession"  Helen Noir  returns to    The Glory    this month and next with a quartet of deliciously camp and cult films, providing us with original live scores. Helen’s legendary soundtracks have changed people’s lives – honestly, literally – when she’s performed them in the past and we are in for quite a giddy treat. Loverboy’s Fallon Gold chatted to Helen about her chosen films, her outstanding career and fantasies of debauched parties in old Hollywood.    This is such a unique approach to film screenings. How did you get into live scoring?  By accident really. I’d just finished a film screening in Tokyo for which I performed existing songs, and was looking for a project that would allow me to write and produce my own music, as well as perform it. Dawn Harvey put a call out for people to present live soundtracks for a series of silent film screenings at the Hackney Picturehouse. I suggested ‘Salomé and it went from there. Now I’m showing four films at The Glory as a mini-season.   I know you put loads of research into selecting the films you are going to perform to. What is your criteria?  I do a lot of research, but it’s a really rewarding part of the process. I’ve always had quite an academic approach, at least before I start writing the music, when it becomes more instinctual, but I really enjoy it – I get to watch lots of films, read in-depth about the performers and history and listen to hours of incredible music. In order to score it, I have to love a film enough to be able to live with it for a prolonged period, and watch it many times over. It must also be very visually appealing to me and I have to feel I can add something by re-scoring it. I wouldn’t use a film that already has an amazing soundtrack – ‘The Hunger’, for example, is one of my favourite films, but the existing music is so perfect I wouldn’t want to reconstruct it. I also try to pick films that are not really well-known so that at least some of the audience won’t have any pre-conception about the soundtrack. I reject a lot of great films because they don’t meet all of my criteria...   Full article here

Loverboy Magazine, October 2016 (interview by Fallon Gold)

"I love performing songs of desperation and obsession"

Helen Noir returns to The Glory this month and next with a quartet of deliciously camp and cult films, providing us with original live scores. Helen’s legendary soundtracks have changed people’s lives – honestly, literally – when she’s performed them in the past and we are in for quite a giddy treat. Loverboy’s Fallon Gold chatted to Helen about her chosen films, her outstanding career and fantasies of debauched parties in old Hollywood.

This is such a unique approach to film screenings. How did you get into live scoring?
By accident really. I’d just finished a film screening in Tokyo for which I performed existing songs, and was looking for a project that would allow me to write and produce my own music, as well as perform it. Dawn Harvey put a call out for people to present live soundtracks for a series of silent film screenings at the Hackney Picturehouse. I suggested ‘Salomé and it went from there. Now I’m showing four films at The Glory as a mini-season.

I know you put loads of research into selecting the films you are going to perform to. What is your criteria?
I do a lot of research, but it’s a really rewarding part of the process. I’ve always had quite an academic approach, at least before I start writing the music, when it becomes more instinctual, but I really enjoy it – I get to watch lots of films, read in-depth about the performers and history and listen to hours of incredible music. In order to score it, I have to love a film enough to be able to live with it for a prolonged period, and watch it many times over. It must also be very visually appealing to me and I have to feel I can add something by re-scoring it. I wouldn’t use a film that already has an amazing soundtrack – ‘The Hunger’, for example, is one of my favourite films, but the existing music is so perfect I wouldn’t want to reconstruct it. I also try to pick films that are not really well-known so that at least some of the audience won’t have any pre-conception about the soundtrack. I reject a lot of great films because they don’t meet all of my criteria...

Full article here

 Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine, March 2016 (photo David Hughes)

Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine, March 2016 (photo David Hughes)

 Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine photo David Hughes

Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine photo David Hughes

 Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine photo David Hughes

Theo Adams Company/Ponystep Magazine photo David Hughes